About your Search

20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
right here in the united states. she joins us live tonight from bahrain. melissa, great to see you, safe and sound. you spent the night on the uss enterprise, the crown jewel of the navy's fifth fleet. stationed in bahrain where the iran threatened to shut down. this is a vessel with tremendous amount of history. tell us about it. >> oh, absolutely. it has been on the water for 51 years. it was parked off cuba during the cuban missile crisis. right now it is patrolling the arabian sea as you said, keeping the strait of hormuz open. rear admiral walter carter talked to us exclusive and we asked him how leaders in the area feel about iran's threat to shut down the strait of hormuz and here's what he had to say. >> like the entire global economy. they're very concerned about that and our job here is to make sure that freedom of navigation occurs through that very critical strait. it is well-known the amount of trade and commerce that goes through there. so just take a look what goes through there. liquified natural gas, huge product that comes out of the country of qatar. oil products impor
intimidate american economic interests, companies, multinational companies be so that the united states would react in their favor. melissa: so they were what? leave these countries, try and it includes american policy? when they get these multinational companies to do? >> look at the first-aid, what's happening right now. the united states has to for security reasons withdrawal. would draw people from those countries. that would leave the companies alone, and there would have protection, coordination with the embassies. this is where a second wave is possible that would hit those companies with the interests or their allies. my concern would be if the wrong moves in, so far it hasn't, but if they move in on the eastern side of the mediterranean and the gulf area then we have a war crisis. melissa: what's interesting is we have seen businesses get attacked. we're focus of most corn on the protest, but i don't think that's been as much focus on what's going on with international companies. this could have a big economic impact. >> welcome before the embassies and consulates were attacked we we
, the united states will stand along with our allies and put a time frame, a time limit on this and really force iranian compliance with the iaea regulations or the consequences would be really, detrimental for iran and the economy and perhaps take a military course. melissa: yeah, it feels like we're not having impact. that's why we're talking about all these things tonight. thank you very much ambassador, for coming on. >> thank you very much. melissa: hoards of demonstrators violently taking to the streets of greece and spain to protest new austerity measures. governments are trying to take one step forward to solve the continent's debt crisis but some citizens seemed determine to take two steps back. with the u.s. trying to solve its own looming debt crisis could we see this kind of turmoil break out here? steve moore from "the wall street journal" joins me with more on this. we watch these protests going on in the streets and the first thing on my mind is that it seems like things are getting worse instead of better across europe and i thought that we had sort of solved, at least part
one. number two the president needs to talk about the relationship between the united states and israel. when he says that israel, that the united states always has their back on all issues what does that specifically mean? i think, three, the president owes it to the people of this country to know what his foreign policy is. the president in 2008 laid out a foreign policy that he would hit reset button with russia. i believe that has failed. melissa: yeah. >> he said he would have negotiations with iran. that has clearly failed. iran is closer to nuclear weapon, melissa, than ever before. he has said that the arab world would have a much better relationship because he is the president. that's not the case when you have these sort of concerted organized abuses going on. melissa: right. start with the first one, saying the war on terror is still ongoing. do you think that it is realistic that he would do that give that he sort of spiked the football with the death of osama bin laden saying that it was almost over? do you think that he is really going to acknowledge that is sti
diplomats in the region is to represent the united states, to advance business and security interests. they will be out there doing that, regardless of the level of threat. they will just be more careful. melissa: we had a guest on yesterday saying international companies will pull back, having their people out in regions where they are receiving these threats. it seems like it is the smart thing to do. now you have al qaeda saying that they are focusing on threatening companies internationally as well and their personnel. do you think this poses a threat to international business, and in fact the global economy? >> first of all, not to the global economy. in the terms of american business interests, each company must, based upon its own legal and insurance policies, take care with its own employees, particularly when there are threats out there like that. each company has its own polly, melissa. again, i do not think this will have to long-term, significant impact we can measure on either the american business posture in the middle east or on the global economy. melissa: you are some
and the united states. libya, for example, has brought its oil industry back online. it is pumping more than i believe a million barrels a day. these are essential to the oil markets internationally and to the price of gas here in the united states. so it's not just oil. it's also international security. it is future of israel. it is our long-term interests in the middle east. melissa: is it working? i hear what you're saying and you look at pictures and see what happens, you have to ask yourself is it working? >> of course those of us who have been out there, we're shocked and we're obviously very, very saddened by these events and our first reaction of one, gee, why does this happen? what we have to do is first of all see what the governments will do in response to these attacks. they have an absolute responsibility to protect embassies and diplomatic establishments. this was not done at all in the case of egypt. the libyans tried. there was a major gunbattle with terrorists involved. we have to see in days ahead how these governments react. i think we should withold judgment on the next ste
countries ended up with. they keep on running debt and our dollar gets devaluated. the u.s., the united states gets deevaluated. this is wrong. they have got to bring up what are we going to do, what is your administration going to do? but more important, i haven't heard anything new. what are going to do to lower the deficit? what will you do to create more jobs? what will you do to be more accountable for that? if they don't mention that, america becomes like europe and none of us in america want that. none of us want that. melissa: from the reports i've been hearing about the democratic national convention and speech i'm watching they're embracing their spendingselves. they feel very good about this. you heard neil cavuto talk about this. spending makes sense. this is what you do as a government. isn't that your impression being there? >> well, priority, i love you out there, okay. that is a priority. but what is very important that we love each other as this, they're not addressing it. america that is very important. we don't want to go bankrupt. if bankrupt happens, there is less s
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)